Panopticism foucault essay

In 2009, Leucht published a meta-analysis of 38 trials of second-generation antipsychotics and reported a response rate of 41% for the drug-treated patients versus 24% for the placebo group. Lieberman and colleagues cite this study as providing solid evidence for regularly prescribing antipsychotics to patients experiencing psychotic episodes. “This magnitude of therapeutic effect compares favorably with many of the most effective treatments in non-psychiatric fields of medicine,” they wrote.

Stet is the online journal of the postgraduate community of the English Department at King's College London

International Workshop
23-24 January, 2014
Centre d’Història de la Ciència (CEHIC)
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)-Institut d’Estudis Catalans (IEC)
Barcelona In spite of the longstanding perception of modern science as value-free knowledge of the external world, the boundaries between a supposed ideology-free history of ideas and an ideology-loaded social history of science have been progressively blurred in the last decades. As a result, criticisms of the autonomy and neutrality of modern science have permeated more or less explicitly recent historiography of science. Within such a framework, the profiles, responsibilities and commitments of academics, and especially of those involved in the natural sciences, have been dramatically realigned.
As some recent scholarship has shown, of particular significance in discussing these issues are the reflections of the political thinker Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937). In his Prison Notebooks of the 1920s and the 1930s, he provided scholars with an effective vocabulary to critically grasp new interactions between science and society. Key notions such as “cultural hegemony,” and the role of the “intellectuals” (scientists, experts, popularizers, educators), when raised within the context of historiography of science, may help to articulate new approaches for understanding the relationship between science and social control. The workshop aims at examining and assessing the ways in which hegemonic values and science have been continuously intertwined. It may provide the opportunity to bring to surface the manner in which science—through its practices, conceptions, justifications, transmission, circulation and employment—mirrored power relations in the past.

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panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

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panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

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panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

International Workshop
23-24 January, 2014
Centre d’Història de la Ciència (CEHIC)
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)-Institut d’Estudis Catalans (IEC)
Barcelona In spite of the longstanding perception of modern science as value-free knowledge of the external world, the boundaries between a supposed ideology-free history of ideas and an ideology-loaded social history of science have been progressively blurred in the last decades. As a result, criticisms of the autonomy and neutrality of modern science have permeated more or less explicitly recent historiography of science. Within such a framework, the profiles, responsibilities and commitments of academics, and especially of those involved in the natural sciences, have been dramatically realigned.
As some recent scholarship has shown, of particular significance in discussing these issues are the reflections of the political thinker Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937). In his Prison Notebooks of the 1920s and the 1930s, he provided scholars with an effective vocabulary to critically grasp new interactions between science and society. Key notions such as “cultural hegemony,” and the role of the “intellectuals” (scientists, experts, popularizers, educators), when raised within the context of historiography of science, may help to articulate new approaches for understanding the relationship between science and social control. The workshop aims at examining and assessing the ways in which hegemonic values and science have been continuously intertwined. It may provide the opportunity to bring to surface the manner in which science—through its practices, conceptions, justifications, transmission, circulation and employment—mirrored power relations in the past.

Action Action

panopticism foucault essay
Panopticism foucault essay

Action Action

Panopticism foucault essay

Action Action

panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

Stet is the online journal of the postgraduate community of the English Department at King's College London

Action Action

panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

International Workshop
23-24 January, 2014
Centre d’Història de la Ciència (CEHIC)
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)-Institut d’Estudis Catalans (IEC)
Barcelona In spite of the longstanding perception of modern science as value-free knowledge of the external world, the boundaries between a supposed ideology-free history of ideas and an ideology-loaded social history of science have been progressively blurred in the last decades. As a result, criticisms of the autonomy and neutrality of modern science have permeated more or less explicitly recent historiography of science. Within such a framework, the profiles, responsibilities and commitments of academics, and especially of those involved in the natural sciences, have been dramatically realigned.
As some recent scholarship has shown, of particular significance in discussing these issues are the reflections of the political thinker Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937). In his Prison Notebooks of the 1920s and the 1930s, he provided scholars with an effective vocabulary to critically grasp new interactions between science and society. Key notions such as “cultural hegemony,” and the role of the “intellectuals” (scientists, experts, popularizers, educators), when raised within the context of historiography of science, may help to articulate new approaches for understanding the relationship between science and social control. The workshop aims at examining and assessing the ways in which hegemonic values and science have been continuously intertwined. It may provide the opportunity to bring to surface the manner in which science—through its practices, conceptions, justifications, transmission, circulation and employment—mirrored power relations in the past.

Action Action

panopticism foucault essay

Panopticism foucault essay

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Panopticism foucault essay

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Panopticism foucault essay

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